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Monday, May 16, 2016

Have we Destroyed 300 Years of American History? - Coweta Co. GA Wills, Estates - #genealogy - #georgiapioneers

Jeannette Holland AustinHave we Destroyed 300 Years of American History?
By Jeannette Holland Austin

Given that progress has taken down so much of our history, is there anything left for us to see, even after only 300 years in this country? As genealogists travel through old towns and villages searching for the past, it is obvious that the old folks are gone and the tales are forgotten. Traditionally, each town had its historian, someone who remembered. And this is where one could hear of local events and families never preserved in history books! Fortunately, old newspapers assist, especially when they contain local columns which detail some events such as who visited whom this week. Typically, the first page of old Georgia newspapers contain foreign and national news, followed by pages of more of same until finally the local column pops up and provides tidbits of family adventures. In modern times, this column is named the "social page." Occasionally, a reporter interviews a local farmer or veteran. And the obituaries are worth reading because of the care which was given to the detail into the life of the deceased. The collection of old newspapers available to members of Georgia Pioneers



newspaper

Coweta County Wills, Estates, Marriages, Map

Newnan, Georgia The Creek Indians ceded the land in Lee, Muscogee, Troup, Coweta, and Carroll counties in the 1825 Treaty of Indian Springs where Chief McIntosh was killed because of it. The counties' boundaries were created by the Georgia General Assembly on June 9, 1826, but they were not named until December 14, 1826. Coweta County was named for the Koweta Indians (a sub-group of the Creek people), who had several towns in and around present day Coweta. Researchers should also research Henry, Fayette and Spalding Counties.

Genealogy Records Available to Members of Georgia Pioneers

Wills
  • Wills 1827 to 1847 (abstracts)
  • Wills 1849 to 1885 (abstracts)
  • Wills 1885 to 1910 (abstracts)
Indexes to Probate Records
  • Will Book A, 1828 to 1848
  • Will Book B, 1848 to 1892
  • Annual Returns, Book B, 1837 to 1843
Marriages
  • 1827 to 1849
  • Marriages from newspapers 1885 to 1886
Miscellaneous Records
  • Cates, Asa, 1853, Deed of the Legatees
Maps
  • Map of Coweta County
See how Easy it is to Read old Wills and Estates on Georgia Pioneers
William Hall


Learn if your ancestors left a will or estate record?  An easy, quick (and free) way to find out is to click on the links below.
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County Records of 8 Genealogy Websites

Alabama
Georgia
Kentucky
North Carolina
Virginia
South Carolina
Tennessee


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  1. GeorgiaPioneers.com
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  6. Genealogy-Books.com
  7. GaGraduates.com (Graduates database from ca 1830 to 1925)
  8. SoutheasternGenealogy.com (Miscellaneous records in AL, LA, MD, PA, NJ
    NY, TN, TX)
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