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Friday, January 13, 2017

Duel in Charleston SC #southcarolinapioneersnet

Duel in Charleston 

duels"A report reached us last week that Mr. McDuffie of South Carolina had been killed in a duel by Mr. Metcalfe of Kentucky. But this was not the fact. A challenge was sent by McDuffie to Metcalfe and accepted. Judge Clarke, who acted as the friend of General Metcalf proposed rifles, as the weapons to be used on the occasion. This was objected to by Major Hamilton, the friend of McDuffie, who contended that the weapon should be pistols. Judge Clarke resisted on their right to the choice, which was not conceded by Major Hamilton. And here the matter rests." Source: The Southern Recorder, Milledgeville, Georgia. March 12, 1827. 
Charleston Co. SC Genealogy Resources and Historical Stories

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When Local Militia Protected Communities #genealogy #history #georgiapioneers

When Local Militia Protected Communities

Militia Companies

Before America was a centralized government, county militia companies were formed to protect its citizens. As new land was settled, there an inherent need to protect people against the various Indian tribes. In fact, rampart hostilities existed up until the time of the Revolutionary War. As settlements moved from East to West, the mountains were occupied by a number of waring Indians who regularly scalped white men and took their women as slaves. Hence, every male 21 years and upwards was expected to join the militia, and they did so willingly. At the onset of the Revolutionary War, the militia companies joined the fight of the rebels, especially while the British occupied Charleston, Savannah and Augusta. While these guys were not part of the Continental Army, they worked with the Continentals under General Greene in and about Georgia and South Carolina in helping to distract the British occupation. Then, during the War Between the States, militia once again took up its rifles to go to war. Prewar militia companies soon became regiments in the Union and Confederate Armies. 

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Thursday, January 12, 2017

Images of Brooks Co. GA Wills, Estates, Confederate Records #genealogy #georgiapioneers

Brooks County Wills, Annual Returns, Bills of Sale, Confederate Pensions


Brooks CountyBrooks County was created in December of 1858 from Lowndes and Thomas Counties. The first court session was held in the home of Thomas Folsom in Quitman. Later in 1859, work began on a court house, however was not finished until 1864. One of the earliest settlers was John Groover, a descendant of Peter Gruber, Saltzburger to Georgia with Oglethorpe, who settler in Ebenezer, Georgia (Effingham County) and whose descendants went to Bulloch and Brooks Counties. Other early settlers were: Levin Arrington, Benjamin Bentley, William Colter, William Dinson, John Edmonson, William G. Hunter, Robert Peacock, Daniel McRae and Leary Stanley. 

Wills and Estates available to Members of Georgia Pioneers 

Indexes to Probate Records
  • Wills, Book I, 1860 to 1899
  • Annual Returns, Bills of Sale, Vouchers, 1859 to 1863
  • Annual Returns, Bills of Sale, Vouchers, 1863 to 1865
  • Will Book I, 1860 to 1899
  • Annual Returns, Bills of Sale, Vouchers, Book D, 1869 to 1872
Digital Images of Last Wills and Testaments 1860 to 1871 
  • Bentley, Benjamin
  • Copeland, L. J.
  • Coulter, William
  • Denson, William
  • Dixon, Pleasant
  • Edmonson, John
  • Edwards, Samuel
  • Gorno, Joel
  • Groover, Charles
  • Groover, John (Estate) 1857-1860
  • Groover, Joshua
  • Hunter, William
  • King, Nancy
  • McCardle, James
  • McLeod, Norman
  • McMullen, John
  • McRae, Daniel
  • Mullen, James
  • Mullen, James
  • Oliff, Elizabeth
  • Patrick, William
  • Patterson, Frances
  • Peacock, Robert
  • Ramsey, Owen
  • Redding, Elkanah
  • Rizer, Charles
  • Rogers, Thomas
  • Slaughter, Thomas
  • Speight, William
  • Stanley, Mary
  • Strickland,Abraham
  • Thigpen, Sarah
  • Yates, Morgan
  • Young, Mathew
  • Wade, Thomas
  • Walker, James
  • Walker, Joseph
  • Walker, Sarah
  • Williams, John
  • Williams, Thomas
  • Wilson, Jeremiah


Civil War
  • Confederate Pensions of Soldiers and Widows

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Wednesday, January 11, 2017

Images of White County Wills and Estates #genealogy #georgiapioneers

White County Wills and Estates


White County GeorgiaWhite County in 1857 from a part of the original land lot county of Habersham and was named for Newton County Representative David T. White, who helped to attain passage of an act creating the new county. The county seat is Cleveland, Georgia. 

White County Databases Available to Members of Georgia Pioneers 

Indexes to Probate Records
  • Will Bk I, 1863-1893.
  • Index to White County Will Book 2, 1893-1961.
  • Inventories, Appraisements, Sales, Book 1, 1859-1875.
  • Inventories, Appraisements, Sales, Book 2, 1869-1929.
Digital Images of White County Wills (1863-1893)

Testators: William Allison, Isaac Black, Larkin Brownlow, Alfred Clark, James Colley, Henry Conley, Mordecai Cox, John Craven, Wiley Dean, Green Dodd, Vesta Doe, John Dorsey, Joseph Etries, Emily Field, John Field, Robert Foster, Isaac Fowler, Alexander Freeman, Jeptha Freeman, Rufus Gilstrap, John Glen, Ruth Hunt, William Kinsey, Allison Ledford, Francis Logan, John Logan, Joseph McDowell, William McKinney, Christopher Meaders, Elizabeth Nix, Jonas Nix, Ozilla Norris, Samuel Parker, William Pitchford, Osborn Quillian, James Sears, J. W. Sears, William Sears, Littleton Skelton, Noah Sosebee, Martha Standridge, Samuel Standridge (2), Nathaniel Trotter, Berry Turner, Micager Turner, Berry Vickery, Hannah Williams, Abraham Wofford.
Newspapers
  • Images of The Cleveland Progress 1892 to 1893

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Tuesday, January 10, 2017

Images of Wilkes Co. GA Wills, Estates, Marriages, Newspapers #genealogy #georgiapioneers

Wilkes County Wills, Estates, Newspapers, Marriages, Maps


Robert Toombs Museum

Wilkes County was created in 1777 from ceded lands of Cherokee and Creek Indians. People who resided in Wilkes County are also found in Warren and Oglethorpe Counties. Between 1790 and 1854, the legislature took land from Wilkes County to form Elbert County (1790), Oglethorpe County (1793), and Lincoln County (1796), and to help form Warren County (1793) and Taliaferro County (1825). The county seat is Washington, Georgia. Lincoln County should always be researched along with Wilkes. Many of the first settlers came from Virginia and North Carolina to take up the ceded lands (from the Indians) during the late 1700's. Early Settlers: John Heard, William Rasberry, James Gray, David Montgomery, John Marks, Bernard Zimmerman, George Bailey, William Mathis, Solomon Ellis and others. 

Wilkes County Records Available to Members of Georgia Pioneers 

Indexes to Probate Records
  • General Index to Wilkes County Estates, A-G.
  • General Index to Wilkes County Estates, H-L.
  • General Index to Wilkes County Estates, M-Q.
  • General Index to Wilkes County Estates, R-Z.
  • Index to Wilkes County Will Book C, 1786-1806
Digital Images of Wilkes County Wills, Bk C, 1786-1806 
Testators: Bailey, George; Bowen, John; Cochran, Samuel; Cochran, Samuel (2); Daniel, William; Ellis, Solomon; Evans, Susannah; Gibson, Walter; Gooden, William; Gray, James; Heard, John; Lunceford, William; Marks, John; Mathis, William; Montgomery, David; Rasberry, William; Rice, Nathaniel G.; Smith, John; Tatum, Peter; Thomas, Philip; Zimmerman, Bernard.

Marriages
  • Wilkes County Marriages from newspapers 1885-1886.
Maps
  • Map of Wilkes County, 1955.
  • Map of Original Wilkes County.
  • Map of Wilkes County Settlers.
Miscellaneous
  • Origins of Early Settlers to Wilkes County
  • Members of Sardis Church Members in 1805.
Images of Miscellaneous Wills & Estates
  • Anthony, Joseph, Estate (1815) of.
  • Arnold, Moses, Estate (1810) of.
  • Favor, Henry, guardianship of.
  • Favor, John, Sr., Estate (1833) (Image).
  • Favor, John, Estate (1850) (Image).
  • Favor, John, Inventory (1818).
  • Favor, John, Estate (1818) (Image).
  • Favor, Matthew, Bond for Estate of John Favor Sr., 1829 (Image).
  • Favor, Sanders, Guardians of (1819).
  • Keith, George W., Annual Return for the minor children of William A. Keith, deceased, 1850 (Image).
  • Marks, John, estate (image) (1800).
  • McLane, John, LWT, Bk 1792-1801, pp. 115-117.
  • McLane, Mariney, LWT, Bk 1792-1801, pp. 240.
Images of (select issues) Newspapers
  • The Washington Gazette
  • The Southern Courant

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Monday, January 9, 2017

Images of Berrien Co. GA Wills, Estates, Marriages #genealogy #georgiapioneers

Berrien County Wills, Estates, Marriages


Berrien County

Berrien County was created in 1856 from Coffee, Irwin, and Lowndes counties. The county was named for US Senator, John McPherson Berrien, who also served as Andrew Jackson's Attorney General. The old Coffee Road was one of the State's earliest post roads and was used as early as 1823 to transport crops into Florida. Earliest Settlers: Amos Bullard, Wilie Clements, Henry Hutchinson, James Goodman, Dr. William Harrell, John Lee, Thomas Mobley, John McDermits, and Thomas Ray. 

Berrien County Court HouseProbate Records Available to Members of Georgia Pioneers 

Images of Will Book A (1855-1909) 

Testators: Boyt, William;Brinn, J. W.;Brown, John;Carroll, Jessie;Clyatt, Martin;Connell, James;Connell, John;Connell, John E.; Cudney, George;Everet, Phoebe;Garrett, Frances;Giddens, William;Griner, Daniel;Hall, John;Harrell, William;Henderson, Susan;Hester, Jane;Hutchinson, Henry;Kenny, Mary;Lamb, William;Lovitt, Joshua;Lovitt, W. B.;McDermit, John;McMillan, John;Mobley, Thomas;Myers, Susanna;Nicholson, J. L.;Peeples, Lewis;Powell, Mary;Powel, T. W.;Ray, John;Ray, Thomas;Shaw, Jeremiah;Sinach, William;Sirmons, Charlotte;Sutton, John;Tucker, Richard;Tygart, William;Watson, Moses; Williams, E. J.;Williams, James;Williams, Sampson Images of Will Book B (1909-1956)

Testators: Berrien County Will Book B, 1910 to 1856: Albritton, Edwin; Albritton, M. E.; Alexander, Jean and Marian; Brown, John; Brown, Sarulue; Buckholts, Peter; Buie, W. D.; Burkhalter, Mattie; Bussey, Eugene; Coombs, Richard; Darsey, J. D.; Duane, Millard; Futch, Malissa; Gaskins, Bart; Gaskins, Bates; Gaskins, Fannie; Gaskins, Mattie; Gaskins, Marcus; Gaskins, Wycliffe; Gray, Annie; Guthrie, Hariet Ann; Hand, J. M.; Harrell, Daniel; Harrell (Joint Will); Harris, H.; Heath, William; Hendley, J. A.; Knowles, Steve; Major, D. S.; Moore, James; Murry, John; Paulk, John; Parrish, A. J;. Rabun, C. G.; Ray, J. S.; Register, William; Rowan, James; Shockley, E. T.; Robinson, David; Sirmans, Benjamin; Sirmans, T. H.; Smith, Mary Jane; Watson, W. H. 

Indexes to Probate Records
  • Will Book A (1855-1909)
  • Estates, Inventories, Appraisements (1862-1896)
  • Will Book B (1910-1956)
  • Estates, Inventories, Appraisements (1862-1896)
  • Widows and Divisions of Estates (1862-1912)
  • Bills of Sale (1863-1896)
  • Annual Returns and Vouchers (1882-1901)
  • Homestead Records (1873-1897)
Marriages
  • 1856-1900

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Sunday, January 8, 2017

Banks County GA Wills, Estates, Marriages #genealogy #georgiapioneers

Banks County was created in 1858. It was named for Dr. Richard E. Banks, a circuit-riding physician who treated the settlers and native Americans of northern Georgia and South Carolina. The early economy in Banks County was based on cotton and corn, but this gave way to beef and poultry production in the 1920's and textile manufacturing and poultry feeds by the 1960's. Today Banks County is growing rapidly thanks to the increase in the retail and tourism industries located at Banks Crossing (Exit 149, I-85 & US 441). The County was created by an act of the General Assembly signed by Gov. Joseph E. Brown on Dec 11, 1858. According to that legislation, the county was to be laid out from portions of Franklin and Habersham counties on Feb. 1, 1859, with county officers elected the next month. Georgia's 129th county was named for Dr. Richard Banks, a noted Gainesville physician and surgeon who died three years earlier. The first county courthouse was completed in 1863. It was constructed of hand-made bricks in the Greek Revival style. It is on the National Register of Historical Places and now serves as a museum and office space. 

Records Available to Members of Georgia Pioneers

Last Wills and Testaments
  • Wills (1858 to 1879) (abstracts)
  • List of Unbound Arranged Wills of the Probate Court (1853 to 1946)
  • Thompson, J. K. estate (1902)
Indexes to Probate Records
  • Miscellaneous Estates (1858 to 1857)
  • Inventories, Annual Returns, Receipts and Appraisements (1866-1871)
Marriages
  • Licenses 1859 to 1873
  • Marriages from newspapers 1885 to 1886
Cemeteries
  • Broad River Baptist Church
  • Indian Creek Baptist Church
  • Lines Baptist Church


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Saturday, January 7, 2017

Train Wrecks vs. Auto Wrecks #genealogy #georgiapioneers

Train Wrecks

railroadsWith the building of the railroads during the 1830s and 1840s, many accidents occurred. We may complain about automobile accidents today, however, train accidents and death were rather common in the old days. Why? Well, for one think, the tracks were built on streets which were also used by pedestrians. I grew up in Atlanta during the 1940s and the railroad tracks crossed five points in downtown without guard rails or platforms of any kind. Of course, terminal or railroad depots, had platforms, but irrespectively, people careless fell upon the tracks. Today, despite the fact that there are signal lights and barriers at crossings, accidents still occur because people ignore safety issues. "Will Copeland, in attempting to jump on a moving train at Big Raccoon on the East Tennessee Road, missed his foothold and fell wounded, and was carried off to Dallas (Georgia)." Source: The Washington Gazette. July 27, 1887. 

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