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Friday, September 1, 2017

Images of White County Wills and Estates #genealogy #georgiapioneers

White County Wills and Estates


White County GeorgiaWhite County in 1857 from a part of the original land lot county of Habersham and was named for Newton County Representative David T. White, who helped to attain passage of an act creating the new county. The county seat is Cleveland, Georgia. 

White County Databases Available to Members of Georgia Pioneers 

Indexes to Probate Records
  • Will Bk I, 1863-1893.
  • Index to White County Will Book 2, 1893-1961.
  • Inventories, Appraisements, Sales, Book 1, 1859-1875.
  • Inventories, Appraisements, Sales, Book 2, 1869-1929.
Digital Images of White County Wills (1863-1893)

Testators: William Allison, Isaac Black, Larkin Brownlow, Alfred Clark, James Colley, Henry Conley, Mordecai Cox, John Craven, Wiley Dean, Green Dodd, Vesta Doe, John Dorsey, Joseph Etries, Emily Field, John Field, Robert Foster, Isaac Fowler, Alexander Freeman, Jeptha Freeman, Rufus Gilstrap, John Glen, Ruth Hunt, William Kinsey, Allison Ledford, Francis Logan, John Logan, Joseph McDowell, William McKinney, Christopher Meaders, Elizabeth Nix, Jonas Nix, Ozilla Norris, Samuel Parker, William Pitchford, Osborn Quillian, James Sears, J. W. Sears, William Sears, Littleton Skelton, Noah Sosebee, Martha Standridge, Samuel Standridge (2), Nathaniel Trotter, Berry Turner, Micager Turner, Berry Vickery, Hannah Williams, Abraham Wofford.
Newspapers
  • Images of The Cleveland Progress 1892 to 1893

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Friday, August 25, 2017

Camden Co. GA Probate Records and Genealogies #georgiapioneers #georgiagenealogy

Camden County Wills, Estates, Marriages, World War I Records



Orange Hall in St. Mary's, GeorgiaThe first known residents were the Mocoma Indians, a predecessor to the Creek confederacy which controlled this land until 1763. On San Pedro Island the Spanish built two missions and had a presidio, at least for a while. By 1690 the Spanish mission was gone but this county was dangerously close to St. Augustine Florida and the site of the Spanish fort which ruled the country until 1745 when General Oglethorpe of Georgia won the land war against Spain. Throughout the colonial period, the Spanish converted local Indians to Catholism (called "Spanish-Indians" and used them for raids against the Georgia colony. Two parishes were created during Colonial days, the Parishes of St. Thomas and St. Mary in 1765, from the Creek Land Cession of 1763. This country played a vivid history during the American Revolution, with Loyalists escaping into Florida via the St. Mary's River. After the Revolutionary War, it was one of te the "Original Counties" which were created in the 1777 and was named for Charles Pratt, the Earl of Camden, who was a strong supporter of American Independence. During the 19th century some of the Loyalist traitors returned to Georgia to reside in Camden County. Reseaching the census records for Camden County reveals persons born in Florida and Georgia. Researchers should consider bordering Florida counties as a source of Will Book B was burned. 

Records Available to Members of Georgia Pioneers 

Marriages
  • Camden County Marriages 1818-1890
  • Camden County Marriages from Newspapers 1885-1886
Miscellaneous
  • Camden County Wills 1795-1829 (abstracts)
Images of Camden County Will Book B 1777 to 1787 
Testators: Aken, James; Argerette, John; Arnold, John; Atkinson, Nathan; Bailey, John Jr.; Bailey, John Sr.; Berniss, Eleazer; Bixby, James; Bryant, Langley; Bulkley, Ichabod; Bullin, Bela; Bunkley, Britain; Campbell, Jane, Mrs. alias Jane Taylor; Christopher, Hester; Cole, Ann, Mrs., widow or Richard; Collier, Thomas; Courter, Harmon; Crews, Micajah; Crozier, Samuel; Dallas, William; Davis, Ephraim; Delany, Daniel S.; Deloney, Martha; Desclaux, Joseph; Dilworth, Aramenta; Dilworth, James C.; Eaton, John; Elliott, Alexander; Ester, Richard; Evans, Evan; Gamble, John; Gascognie, Richard; Gorman, William; Gorman, William Jr.; Graham, Alexander; Graham, Ann; Gunby, Levin; Hagin, John; Hay, John; Hebbard, Elihu; Hodge, Joseph T.; Hollingsworth, Timothy; Howell, Catharine; Hubbard, William; Johnston, William; Judson, Joseph; Keegan, Allen; King, Thomas; Kitchell, John or Joseph; Kuhn, C. F.; Keegan, Allen; Lafurgue, John; Lathrop, Asa; Lefevre, Marie Louisa; Madison, John R.; Mafford, Thomas; Madison, John Ripley; McClure, William; McFarlane, Sarah; McGregger, James; Mecklin, Sarah; Miller, Catharine; Miller, Phineas; Morrison, George; Mussault, Frances; Niblack, William; Nightingale, John Clark; Norris, Thomas; Norris, Thomas; Nunes, Daniel; Ogden, Alexander; Parker, John; Pelletier, Basile; Proctor, Richard; Ragland, Irby; Rains, Cornelius; Ready, William; Richards, Genevieve B.; Richardson, Thomas; Rogers, Lebbiers or Lebues; Ross, John Dr.; Rowe, John; Rudolph, Robert; Shaw, James; Shearman, Elizabeth; Sherman,, Edward; Skipwith, Peyton; Smith, James; Spalding, Johnson; Stafford, Robert; Stafford, Thomas; Starling, Francis; Staunton, William; Thomas, Allen; Thomas, Joseph; Vincent, James; Ward, Bryan; Williams, Jane; Williams, William H.; Williams, Wilson; Wood, John; Woodland, James; Wright, Henry; Wright, James Nickels; Wright, Thomas 

Images of Will Book A 1795 to 1829
Testators: Aken, James;Argerette, John;Arnold, John;Atkinson, Nathan;Bailey, John Jr.;Bailey, John Sr.;Berniss, Eleazer;Bixby, James;Bryant, Langley; Bulkley, Ichabod;Bullin, Bela;Bunkley, Britain;Campbell, Jane, Mrs. alias Jane Taylor;Christopher, Hester;Cole, Ann, Mrs., widow or Richard;Collier, Thomas;Courter, Harmon;Crews, Micajah;Crozier, Samuel; Dallas, William;Davis, Ephraim;Delany, Daniel S.;Deloney, Martha; Desclaux, Joseph;Dilworth, Aramenta;Dilworth, James C.;Eaton, John; Elliott, Alexander;Ester, Richard;Evans, Evan;Gamble, John;Gascognie, Richard;Gorman, William;Gorman, William Jr.;Graham, Alexander; Graham, Ann;Gunby, Levin;Hagin, John;Hay, John;Hebbard, Elihu; Hodge, Joseph T.;Hollingsworth, Timothy;Howell, Catharine; Hubbard, William;Johnston, William;Judson, Joseph;Keegan, Allen; King, Thomas;Kitchell, John or Joseph;Kuhn, C. F.;Keegan, Allen; Lafurgue, John;Lathrop, Asa;Lefevre, Marie Louisa;Madison, John R.; Mafford, Thomas;Madison, John Ripley;McClure, William;McFarlane, Sarah; McGregger, James;Mecklin, Sarah;Miller, Catharine;Miller, Phineas; Morrison, George;Mussault, Frances;Niblack, William;Nightingale, John Clark;Norris, Thomas;Norris, Thomas;Nunes, Daniel;Ogden, Alexander; Parker, John;Pelletier, Basile;Proctor, Richard;Ragland, Irby; Rains, Cornelius;Ready, William;Richards, Genevieve B.;Richardson, Thomas;Rogers, Lebbiers or Lebues;Ross, John Dr.;Rowe, John; Rudolph, Robert;Shaw, James;Shearman, Elizabeth;Sherman, Edward; Skipwith, Peyton;Smith, James;Spalding, Johnson;Stafford, Robert; Stafford, Thomas;Starling, Francis;Staunton, William;Thomas, Allen; Thomas, Joseph;Vincent, James;Ward, Bryan;Williams, Jane;Williams, William H.;Williams, Wilson;Wood, John;Woodland, James;Wright, Henry; Wright, James Nickels;Wright, Thomas; 

Images of Camden County Will Book C 1885-1900 
Testators: Ammons, William;Anderson, Ben;Arnow, Joseph S.;Baker, Jeff;Barnard, Fannie E.;Baxley, James W.;Beaty, Richard;Benson, George W.; Berrie, Catharine A.;Brazick, James;Brown, Philip;Buncke, Gustar; Bunkley, William R.;Caldwell, W. J.;Carnegie, Lucie C., Mrs.; Carnegie, Thomas M.;Clarke, William H.;Clinch, D. L.;Clubbs, Sarah F.; Cohen, Mary A.;Crichton, Ann;Curtis, Alexander;Davis, J. S. N.; Dunham, Andrew J.;Floyd, John W.;Floyd, Marie;Fordham, Silas; Grubert, Jane U.;Harrington, J. B., Mrs.;Hawkins, Thomas D.; Hayes, Calvin;Helveston, McGillis;Hopkins, William F.; Jaflores, Virginia, Mrs.;King, Dolly;King, R. N.;Lang, Caroline; Lang, Cornelia T.;Lang, George;Lang, Isaac;Lang, Isaac Sr.; Lang, Nancy;Lang, W. C.;Long, Alexander;Long, Daniel J.; Long, Julia M.;McCorman, Charlotte;Mitchell, Augustus; Morrison, Charlotte E.;Morrison, George;Pacetty, Julia A.; Peeples, A. M.;Proctor, William;Rains, Joseph C.;Rightman, Anita M.; Ring, Mary;Ripley, Francis L.;Rose, D. F. Sr.;Scott, Alexander C. Sr.; Simmons, John W.;Stafford, Robert;Thomas, Benjamin;Tompkins, John; Trolock, Isabella C.;Walton, Grace;Wilkinson, Elsie;Wilkinson, Eley; Williams, John M.;Wingate, Thomas Military Records
  • Camden County World War I Service Records 1917-1919 (Army, Navy, Marines (Digital Images)
Indexes to Probate Records
  • Camden County Index to Estates 1811 to 1828
  • Camden County Index to Annual Returns 1829 to 1848
  • Camden County Index to Will Book 1795 to 1829
  • Camden County Index to Will Book 1868 to 1916
  • Camden County Index to Will Bk C 1885-1900
City Directories
  • 1892 St. Marys, Georgia City Directory (Digital Images)
Special Notes
  • Origins of Early Settlers of Camden County

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Friday, June 23, 2017

Terrell Co. GA Genealogy Records #georgiapioneers

Terrell County Genealogy, Wills, Estates, Marriages, Maps


Terrell County Court House

Terrell County was created in 1856 from Lee and Randolph Counties. Early settlers were: Richard Beal, R. C. Andrews, James Brown and C. E. Farrar.

Terrell County Databases Available to Members of Georgia Pioneers

Digital Images of Will Book A 1857-1871 
Testators: Barnett, Samuel; Brim, James; Cheny, Frederick; Christie, Benjamin ; Collins, Harvey; Coolidge, Albert; Cozart, Anthony; Enten, Elizabeth; Ethridge, Aaron; Gammage, Zachariah; Garlington, Christopher; Gay, Asberry; Jordan, Moses; Jordan, Randall; Kaigler, Amos; Kaigler, David ; Kelly, Charles; Kemp, Benjamin; Laine, Robert; Martin, Thomas; Martin, Willis; Mercer, Leonidas; Mercer, John T.; Musgrove, Harrison ; Ravens, David; Simpson, John; Speight, Cicero; Taylor, James; Todd, Alexander; Warnock, Elizabeth;Wynn, Thomas
Indexes to Probate Records
  • Index to Terrell County Will Bk A, 1857-1913 (faded ink).
Marriages
  • Terrell County Marriages from Newspapers 1885-1886.
Maps
  • Terrell County Map.

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Thursday, June 22, 2017

A Clue on How to Find Unique Information about your Ancestors #georgiapioneers #genealogy


Looking for Ancestors? Here is a comment about G. L. Barker from The Southern States Magazine, March 1894

James LongstreetSometimes to find ancestors the researcher must seek rare and interesting resources. There are genealogical and historical magazines out there. " G. N. Barker, a resident of Longstreet, Georgia in 1889, occupied in stock raising, etc., I may be able to point out a few advantages and differences relative to these parts. What will strike the farmer most on arriving in this section is the total absence of grass meadows or any visible facilities for the pasturing of stock, but curiously enough, an abundance of fairly nutritious hay may be cut during summer, of sufficient nutritive value with the assistance of a little grain for stock. The corn crop is light per acre to one used to the West; oats, however, yield well when well cultivated, and are off the ground in May, the same ground making also a good hay crop the same year. Bermuda grass makes an inexhaustible supply of pasture for all stock, except three winter months when green rye, barley or oats will take its place. Italian rye grass I have found grows luxuriantly during winter and spring, and it makes more milk than almost any herb. Red top grass also succeeds well. During summer there is an abundance of forage crops for all classes of stock, and of good nutritious quality. Stock is healthy here, provided it is kept clean and not overfed with too highly fattening foodstuffs. My health has vastly improved in this climate and I have recovered from the exposures of the Northwest. The land here is poor and run down, but good cultivation and moderate manuring soon restore a fertility that is astonishing to anyone seeing only what is done without fertilizer. The greatest drawbacks in this section are the total inability of the laborer, merchant and business man to comprehend or encourage anything but cotton. All kinds of fruits flourish with good care bestowed upon them." Source:The Southern States, March 1894, An Illustrated Monthly Magazine Devoted to the South 
more

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Wednesday, June 21, 2017

Scotch-Irish Settlers Gave us Linen Cloth #genealogy #georgiapioneers #history

Scotch-Irish Settlers Gave us Linen Cloth 

spinning wheelThe Trustees gave the first settlers to Georgia an inventory of two woollen dressed to wear in the colony. Soon after the first emigrants, the Trustee's Garden in Savannah was established with its main focus upon raising the silk worm. The settlers were given land grants and 500 plants of mulberry cuttings. Although the quality of the silk was favorably compared with the Chinese and samples taken to King George of England, the settlers had such a poor start that they went to raising cattle instead. Thus, the venture failed. However, the Scottish settlers who settled Darien raised hemp and wove that into a fine linen cloth, much more desirable than woollen. As time went by and cotton was a popular crop, women spun the cotton balls into thread and this product clothed the families.  McIntosh County Genealogy Records and Histories

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Tuesday, June 20, 2017

Cherokees in the Cohutta Mountains #georgiapioneers #genealogy #cherokees

Cherokees in the Cohutta Mountains

Cohutta MountainsThere is a range of mountains in Murray County which were once occupied by the Cherokee Indians; viz: Big Frog Mountain, Fort Mountain and Grassy Mountain. Actually, the recent discovery there by archaeologist Julia Sennette revealed a ceremonial site and several monoliths, quarried into geometrical shapes. 

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Old Georgia Schools and Their Masters #genealogy #georgiapioneers

Old Georgia Schools and Their Masters

Willow Springs SchoolPlantation or field shools were used to teach children, and later, students went abroad to universities in England. Proof of this is contained in the 2-set volume of Memoirs of Georgia publiced in 1895, where families were interviewed and extensive information was provided. If you think that educational materials were lacking, you are mistaken, for the children learned all of the basics: writing, reading, arithmetic. An examination of some old report cards in the mid 20th century reveal an intense study of the most basic subjects. In fact, the required subjects of the grammar and high schools of today compare poorly. By the time that colonial children completed the most rudimary education, they were prepared to meet all the challenges of running their own farm or plantation, from architectural skills to a complex accounting system. 

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Sunday, June 18, 2017

The Etowah Discoveries in Cartersville GA #genealogy #georgiapioneers

The Etowah Discoveries

Etowah FiguresThe archaeological site of the Etowah Mounds is one of the largest of its kind discovered in North America thus far. I say "thus far" because of the western discoveries in Illinois near Mississippi River which has revealed extensive mounds. Indian mounds have been regarded as "burial sites", however, excavations into the mounds reveal tall buildings and temples. It appears that the main town fortress was elevated, looking down upon the village. The Etowah Mounds are measured bo be more than 300 square feet at the base and rises to a height of slightly more than 60 feet. The site includes 54 acres on the Etowah River and is located about three miles south of Cartersville. The most noticeble aspects of it are three largely visible earthen mounds, although there are more. The temple mound, is more than 300 square feet at the base and rises to a height of slightly more than 60 feet. The Etowah mounds are situated along the sides of two rectangular plazas. The mounds are shaped in the form of four-sided, flat-topped pyramids and appears to have originally served as platforms. The platform is common to other sites, also, suggesting an area of public affairs. The public buildings have rotted away, year for more than 100 years, artifacts were unearthed here. A number of archaeologists date this settlement back 300 years. The question arises, when the various Indian tribes were driven west, were the Americans aware of such expansive villages? Genealogists and historians have a number of maps which locate Indian villages, but do we realize how much culture was lost? For researchers, there is a need to discover old writings and records of the past, and how do we but what many relics are yet to be found? 

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