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Monday, July 2, 2018

How did my People Die? #georgiapioneerscom #gagenealogy #gaancestors


"How did my People Die?"

German CemeteryThere could be many unidentified bodies in this old German cemetery. The genealogist does not always locate a death certificate which mentions the ailment. Yet there are other means of discovery. As diseases such as measles, diptheria and the whooping cough swept the children of old farms and communities, one can ascertain the date of the event by viewing old tombtones. Events spaced within several days or weeks were times of sickness. A careful search within family plots is even more revealing, as unmarked graves are represented by sunken soil. There may have been a wooden marker placed at the head of the grave on that unpleasant day, now hidden in the soil. On the day that Tom Clements of Forsyth, Georgia died, it rained all day. He was to be buried inside the old Davis Smith cemetery at Brent, sittiing at the top of a hill, and enclosed by a wall of white rocks. The grave had been dug, however, was filled with rain water. Hence, the day in burying him. There are many similiar stories, no longer remembered because the generations all are gone. see images of Madison Co. GA Wills & Estates




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Wednesday, June 27, 2018

The Easier Road to Genealogy

The Easier Road to Genealogy

scenic roadAn easier method of tracing ancestors is available should one study the history of the times. Sure, there are the standard history books. However, those books provided in schools, libraries and elsewhere do not begin to describe the history of any given era. Because it is the people themselves who make history. A few characters who fought in the Revolutionary War or made laws, does not begin to describe the real history! The key is to find the old neighborhood. In other words, where the families resided, neighbors and friends who witnessed their deeds, married their daughters, and labored on farms, developing a better way of life. One can learn the names of ancestors, but what did those people accomplishand who were they? County records provide interesting answers but to glean the details one must examine every possible record!


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Friday, June 22, 2018

True Irish Love

True Irish Love

Samuel Harris was born in Ireland near Raphoe, County Donegal, and came to America to make his first residence in Virginia. He served in the American Revolutionary War and drew bounty lands in Greene County, Georgia. He purchased two tracts of land on Clear Creek in Greene County in 1785. During 1792 to 1794 he was listed as having 100 acres of land between the forks upward of Ogeechee including a spring pine tree marked "H. H." The tax digest revealed that he supported 6 slaves on 410 acres on the Ogeechee River in Wilkes County. Harris had served in the war in the Militia Company of Captain Adam Alexander. Tradition has it that Harris was a passenger onboard the same vessel with his wife and that they both died the same day were buried in the same grave upon the site of where they made their first camp in Greene County, near the headwaters of Ogeechee River. 
Names of Greene Co. GA Testators to Wills





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Thursday, May 17, 2018

Free Help on your Brickwall


8 Genealogy Websites is offering free research to Members on their brickwall.  Become a member nos and take advantage now.   This opporunity won't last long.

Jeannette Austin





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Wednesday, April 4, 2018

Will you Allow AI to Construct your Genealogy? #georgiapioneers

Will you Allow AI to Construct your Genealogy?


Photo credited to Dezeen.com
Imagine yourself instructing your computer to assemble a pedigree chart based on the information you provide. As AI draws upon information across thousands of genealogy platforms and assembles the data, would you trust the results?  If IT had access to all of the world's genealogy records, it would probably deliver a fairly accurate genealogy.  The brick walls and suppositions in our work would be analyzed from a mathematical standpoint. Let us face the fact that math is a true science.  I can imagine that when AT hit the brick walls, that he would provide us with a logical choice of the data. Our decision, then, would culminate from the mathematical prowness of a computer. But what about the tidbits of data stored inside our own brain, a sort of family knowledge?  Aunt May always said that our family came to America from Germany, for one example.  There are countless others couched inside of our own brain, not that of IT.

The fastest computer in the world uses about 40,000 processors with 260 cores each. That is more than 10 million processing cores running in parallel. Although each of these cores has less power than the intel processor on your desktop, the entire machine delivers about the same power as the human brain. Interesting. Nevertheless, that does not mean that AI is ready for big things such as robot control. Far from it.  This massively parallel architecture still presents enormous programming challenges in all of the processes powered together. The growth of the IT industry demands the use of custom microchips, more parallelism, more sophistocated software, and even the possibility of entirely new ways of doing computing.  for more articles, Join the Genealogy History Blog





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Wednesday, March 7, 2018

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Thursday, February 22, 2018

Join the Genealogy History blog

Genealogy History Blog 

An invitation to join the "Genealogy History" blog which offers daily articles concerning tracing families from foreign shores and throughout America.  Also, some interesting articles on historical events and how our ancestors are connected by genealogical research.  

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