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Tuesday, April 17, 2018

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Wednesday, April 4, 2018

Will you Allow AI to Construct your Genealogy? #georgiapioneers

Will you Allow AI to Construct your Genealogy?


Photo credited to Dezeen.com
Imagine yourself instructing your computer to assemble a pedigree chart based on the information you provide. As AI draws upon information across thousands of genealogy platforms and assembles the data, would you trust the results?  If IT had access to all of the world's genealogy records, it would probably deliver a fairly accurate genealogy.  The brick walls and suppositions in our work would be analyzed from a mathematical standpoint. Let us face the fact that math is a true science.  I can imagine that when AT hit the brick walls, that he would provide us with a logical choice of the data. Our decision, then, would culminate from the mathematical prowness of a computer. But what about the tidbits of data stored inside our own brain, a sort of family knowledge?  Aunt May always said that our family came to America from Germany, for one example.  There are countless others couched inside of our own brain, not that of IT.

The fastest computer in the world uses about 40,000 processors with 260 cores each. That is more than 10 million processing cores running in parallel. Although each of these cores has less power than the intel processor on your desktop, the entire machine delivers about the same power as the human brain. Interesting. Nevertheless, that does not mean that AI is ready for big things such as robot control. Far from it.  This massively parallel architecture still presents enormous programming challenges in all of the processes powered together. The growth of the IT industry demands the use of custom microchips, more parallelism, more sophistocated software, and even the possibility of entirely new ways of doing computing.  for more articles, Join the Genealogy History Blog





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Wednesday, March 7, 2018

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Thursday, February 22, 2018

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Genealogy History Blog 

An invitation to join the "Genealogy History" blog which offers daily articles concerning tracing families from foreign shores and throughout America.  Also, some interesting articles on historical events and how our ancestors are connected by genealogical research.  

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Friday, February 2, 2018

Gwinnett Co. Wills and Estates; 1851 Chapman Rolls of Cherokees #georgiapioneers #genealogy

Gwinnett County Wills, Estates, Marriages

Buford, GeorgiaThe Creeks and Cherokees occupied this land until they ceded it to the State of Georgia in 1789 and 1790. Gwinnett County was named after Button Gwinnett, a signer of the Declaration of Independence, Governor of Georgia, who died from wounds on May 19, 1771 after dualling in the streets of Savannah with General Lachlan McIntosh, commander of the American forces during the Revolutionary War. Persons who drew in the 1827 and 1832 land lotteries settled in Gwinnett County. The early settling families were: Andrews, Ambrose, Addison, Bracewell, Bridges, Bruton, Bullock, Burton, Burns, Brandon, Carter, Carroll, Choice, Chester, Cosley, Connelly, Cowan, Day, Deaton, Dover, Edwards, Dyer, Durham, Dunlap, Etheridge, Edwards, Glaze, Garmany, Franklin, Freeland, Flowers, Gresham, Gray, Holcombe, Howell, Jackson, James, Kicker, Killian, Kinney, Knight, Lankford, Lester, Light, Lockridge, Martin, Malone, Mann, McKinney, McGinnis, Maynard, Montgomery, Norton, Owen, Pace, Plunkett, Pool, Perkerson, Rakestraw, Rowden, Spruce, Snow, Terrell, Terry, Thomas, Tait, Warbington, Waits, Venable, Vinyard, Wells, Wiley, Whitehead, and others. 

Gwinnett County Genealogy Records Available to Members of Georgia Pioneers 

Marriages
  • Index to Marriages 1843 to 1864
  • Marriage Book 3, 1827-1837
  • Index to Marriages 1871-1882
  • Marriages from newspapers (1885-1886)
Indexes to Probate Court Records
  • Inventories and Annual Returns, Books 10-14, 1872-1895
  • Inventories and Appraisements 1856-1866
  • Inventories and Appraisements 1886-1897
Images of Inferior Court Minutes (1819-1861) 

Images of Wills (1846-1886) Book D, oldest surviving Will Book.

Names of Testators: Amanda M. Adams, John Armistead, A. A. Arnold, William L. Atkinson, Sarah Bagwell, Martha Bailey, William Bailey, Anthony W. Bates, Joseph M. Baxter, John G. Bennett, John J. Bennett, Lovick Bettis, David Bolton, M. M. Bolton, John A. Born, Joseph M. Bowers, Meshack Boyce, Jeffers Bradford, Cashwell Brand, William E. Brand, James Braswell, Tandy H. Brown, Vinson Brownlee, Franklin P. Buchanan, John Bugg, Maria Mackay Burtchell, John L. Burrell, Charles Burson, Daniel M. Byrd, William Davis Byrd, John Cain, John Caloway, Gille Camp, Catharine H. Churchhill, Sterling Clark, Austin W. Cole, Levi M. Cooper, George W. Craig, John E. Craig Sr., Robert Craig, Burton E. Crawford, Robert B. Eckles, Robert Etheridge, James Flowers, Sarah Fountain, Samuel H. Freeman, Marsha Furguson, William Galloway, James Garner, James Garner Sr., Lucretia Garner, John J. Glover, William J. Gober, Marcus L. Gordon, Robert M. Gower, Sarah M. Gower, Robert J. Goza, Lourina Griswell, Thompson Hale, Martha T. Hamilton, Sanford Hannah, Thomas C. Hardigree, Jerry Harris, James Harrison, James Hawthorn, Harrison Head, Lucinda Higgins, Silas Higgins, C. H. Hopkins, John Hopkinns, Luther F. Hopkins, Evan Howell, Thomas Hunter, Andrew J. Hutchins, Nathan Hutchins, William S. Ivie, William G. Jacobs, Kincheon Jenkins, Polly Ann Johnson, Stella Julian, W. T. Kilgore, John King, John Knight, David Langley, James Lanier, Curtis C. Lankford, Zachry J. Lee, Daniel Liddell, Charles H. Linsey, Daniel Lockridge, Hugh D. Lowe, Mary E. Lowe, Amos Lowry, Thomas Maguire, William Maltbie, Elisha Martin, John Martin, Lucy B. Martin, Alexander M. Mason, Charley Mason, William A. Massey, Thomas Matthews, Telford McConnell, John McCurly, Darling P. McDaniel, Eli J. McDaniel, James McDaniel, John S. McElvany, John McMillan, Rhesa McMillan, Thomas Mewborn, Goodwin Miller, Mark Miller, Rache Miner, George W. Mitchell, Middleton Montgomery, Kinchen Mooneyham, John Morrow, John Walker Nash, Robert B. Nash, Harrison Nix, Azariah Noel, Frances L. O'Kelly, Jesse Osborn, Samuel S. Peden, William J. Peeples, William F. Perry, Elijah Pittard, James W. Plummer, John H. Pounds, Turk Rakestraw, Samuel Rawlins, John R. Richards, Mary A. Richardson, Andrew Martin Ross, James S. Russell, William J. Russell, Washington Rutledge, Sanford A. Scales, William Scales, William D. Sexton, Eliza Simmons, James P. Simmons, John Simms, Emily Simonton, James Stanley, Jorden Stanton, George Stephenson, Reason D. Stephens, Van R. Stevenson, Henry P. Thomas, Sivilinett Thomas, William Thrasher, Isaac Tinsey, John Morris Tullis, Howell H. Upchurch, Columbus Webb, Joshua Westbrook, James Wheeler, Richard Whiteworth, Mary Whitworth, Hosea Williams, William P. Williams, Anderson Windsor, Richard D. Winn, Sherwood Wise, Andrew Wood. 

Civil War Records

  • Gwinnett County Civil War Roster 1861-1865

Miscellaneous
  • 1851 Chapman Rolls of Gwinnett County Cherokees
  • Supreme Court Decision of 1832 by Chief Justice Marshall in case of Samuel A. Worcester, Plaintiff in Error

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Friday, January 26, 2018

The Education in Old Georgia Field Schools #genealogy #georgiapioneers

Old Georgia Schools and Their Masters

Willow Springs SchoolPlantation or field shools were used to teach children, and later, students went abroad to universities in England. Proof of this is contained in the 2-set volume of Memoirs of Georgia publiced in 1895, where families were interviewed and extensive information was provided. If you think that educational materials were lacking, you are mistaken, for the children learned all of the basics: writing, reading, arithmetic. An examination of some old report cards in the mid 20th century reveal an intense study of the most basic subjects. In fact, the required subjects of the grammar and high schools of today compare poorly. By the time that colonial children completed the most rudimary education, they were prepared to meet all the challenges of running their own farm or plantation, from architectural skills to a complex accounting system.  Paulding County GA Genealogy & History

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Friday, January 19, 2018

Find Quicker Genealogy Results #georgiapioneers



The Substance of Genealogy = Old Wills and Estates

There is more personal family information and clues contained in old wills and estates than a census record. And it is more accurate because it was written by an ancestor who wished to be remembered, and found later in time; after he had gone. It usually provides all yhe names of the children and their spouses, grandchildren, siblings, parents and could even include the names of relatives residing in foreign countries. Reading an old last will and testament, along with its inventories, sales, annual returns and other estate data is an open book into the life experiences of another person. Also, it provide multiple clues to discovering other relatives, should we examine it more closely. Not only do we get the whereabouts of family members, but also origins. One mention of a relative in a foreign country, for example, is worth thousands of research hours. Actually, estate details provide a parcel of clues in the Annual Returns. These returns commence with the last illness, funeral details, and as additional returns are filed (annually until the final settlement), tidbits appear of personal data appears, such as letters received from relatives in other places and all sorts of clues where to search next. Names of relatives, neighbors and friends are plastered all over those records. And do not forget to search for receipts! If you do this much, more family members will emerge and as well as a pattern of clues.


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Friday, January 12, 2018

What do you think of the Past #georgiapioneers #genealogy

How do you think of the Past?

barnWhen you cozy up under the covers at night, how do you think of our ancestors? The family is about you in almost every aspect of daily life churning activity, making life bitter and sweet. And as your generation swishes by, amid the clamor and distractions, dodging roadblocks and unexpected challenges, will your experience be one of satisfaction and declared goals accomplished? The roadblocks, though different, were all done before, in other generations, as families struggled through it all. Perhaps the whole experience in this world is but one continuous play, with different characters tackling the issues of each generation. How people in past generations dealt with family issues, hardships and even war is admirable. Admirable, because as they faced reality head-on, a clear path of honesty and patriotism was paved for future generations to resolve its issues and maintain the freedoms for which our ancestors fought. As pioneer families from all over Europe settled opon the American soil, their society was one of doing business with individuals of good character, and everything was built upon that foundation. It is a lesson well taught and a formidable guide to strengthen the backbone of this generation. Our ancestors left us many exciting stories which are worth retelling to our children. So that they will remember. I love visiting old homesites because it provides a vision of the old days. There is something soul-binding of simplier times. Trace your families in Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina and Virginia on 8 genealogy sites 

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