Monday, May 23, 2016

The Battle of Chickamauga - Walker Co. GA Wills, Estates, Marriages, Births, Deaths, Church Records #genealogy #georgiapioneers


The Battle of Chickamauga as Told by an Union Officer

An Account by Smith D. Atkins as presented by Smith D. Atkins at the Opera House in Mendota, Illinois. February 22, 1907 at the invitation of Woman's Relief Corps 

Battle of ChickamaugaThe was one of the bloodiest battles of the Confederates. As one visits the scene of the battle in Walker County and the presence of tombstones and graves bedecked in the woods, the emotions of loss are prevalent to the senses. " When the advance of the Army of the Cumberland began it was the desire of General Rosecran, commanding the Army of the Cumberland, to confuse and mislead Bragg, commanding the Confederate Army. Sending a portion of his army, cavalry, infantry and artillery, across the Cumberland mountains into the valley of the Tennessee north of Chattanooga to threaten that city from the north, he led his main army across the Tennessee at Bridgeport, Tennessee, and Caperton's Ferry, Alabama, and crossing the mountains into Lookout Valley, swung his army to the south and west of Chattanooga, rendering the occupation of that city untenable by Bragg with his line of supplies threatened in his rear." Atkins compared the maneuvers with the brilliant and successful as the famous campaign of John Churchill (the Duke of Marlborough) before the battle of Blenheim in 1704. 

"I could plainly see the Confederate fort, and adjusting my field glass hoped to see the effect of his shots; but I was enveloped in smoke when he (Rosecran) fired, and could see nothing. But we learned the effect of his scientific firing a few days afterward when we captured a copy of the Daily Chattanooga Rebel, printed on wall paper, Henry Watterson, now the distinguished editor of the Louisville Courier-Journal, publisher, that said the Yankee artillery at Harrison's Landing at the first fire dismounted the brass gun in the Confederate fort and killed four men." 

" On September 4th, 1863, my regiment was ordered to join Wilder, north of Chattanooga. " It immediately ascended to the top of Walden's Ridge, which was a continuation of Lookout Mountain on the north side of the Tennessee River. " ... from that elevation I looked for hours with my field glass into the deserted streets of Chattanooga and became convinced that Bragg had evacuated that Confederate stronghold." The regiment was then ordered to take the advance into Chattanooga. On the morning of the 9th of September the Union troops crossed the nose of the mountain on the Nashville road and found Confederate cavalry holding the road. When Wilder's Brigade battery from Moccasin Point on the north side of the Tennessee began throwing its shells onto the mountain, enfilading the Union's line of skirmishers, they were compelled to fall back. 

"The battle of Chickamauga was a useless battle, the broken and shattered Army of the Cumberland driven from the field and cooped up and nearly starved to death in Chattanooga, that (General) Rosecrans was in full possession of on September 9th, 1863."

"My orders from General Rosecrans were to enter the city of Chattanooga, obtain all the information possible concerning the evacuation by Bragg, and to return to him with my regiment. When I was ready to start back the road was filled with Crittenden's corps of the Army of the Cumberland, that followed me into Chattanooga, and when just ready to return I was ordered by General Crittenden to go up the Tennessee River to Fire Island, ten miles, and enable Wilder with his brigade to cross." But the Confederate cavalry was ahead, until the regiment reached a famous grape plantation eight miles north of Chattanooga where Wilder's Brigade was already crossing the river. They spent the night at Grayville, east of Chattanooga and during the night received orders to join General Rosecrans at La Fayette. " ...and moving before daylight on September 11th I struck the Confederate pickets about two miles north of Ringgold. Sending word back to Wilder I dismounted my regiment, when the enemy mounted and moved out to charge my line, waiting until they were close upon me my repeating Spencer rifles halted their charge and turned it back. Then they formed in two lines to renew the charge when Wilder came up with a section of 10-pound rifled cannon, and opened immediately. Instantly the artillery fire was answered, but not a shot came near us; firing again with our artillery, instantly came the response. We did not know it then, but Crittenden's troops were approaching Ringgold from the west and we from the north, and it was Crittenden's guns we heard, while Forrest retreated through Ringgold gap. Had Crittenden's troops and Wilder's Brigade been acting in concert, General Forrest and his cavalry would have been captured at Ringgold. Sending out a company on the La Fayette road, the enemy was found in strong force at the Chickamauga River, and my regiment marched to Rossville, reaching there after dark. Confident that Rosecrans was in Chattanooga, and not in La Fayette, I sent officers to Chattanooga before daylight on the 12th of September, but they did not return to me, and an hour after daylight I took the road to La Fayette, striking the enemy in strong force at Gordon's Mill on the Chickamauga. I was without corn for my animals, and finding a corn field I fed my horses and filled the nose-bags with corn." "

On the morning of September 19, 1863, the Army of the Cumberland began its race for Chattanooga flanked by the army of General Bragg. The race continued all day long. Aiken's regiment was ordered by General Rosecran to take its position in a field southeast of Widow Glenn's house. During that time they skirmished with the Confederate line and captured a prisoner west of the LaFayette road. " The prisoner was brought immediately to me. He was a Virginia boy, badly frightened at first, but he soon told me that he belonged to Longstreet's corps from the Virginia Army, and detailed to me how he came by cars, where they disembarked, and how they marched to the battlefield. I took the prisoner, the first one captured from Longstreet's corps, to General Rosecrans at his then headquarters at Widow Glenn's house, and told him that I had a prisoner from Longstreet's corps, when Rosecrans flew into a passion, denounced the little boy as a liar, declared that Longstreet's corps was not there. The little boy prisoner was so frightened that he would not speak a word. In sorrow I turned away, and joined my regiment. Rosecrans found out that Longstreet's corps was there."

Afterwards Aiken's regiment was on the LaFayette road when compelled to withdraw as the Confederates swarmed forcefully across his right flank. They came upon thousands of Union troops in disorder running off through the woods toward Chattanooga. 

"Daylight came; with it white flags in our front where the Confederates were burying their dead. An hour after daylight I discovered a heavy column of the enemy, in column of companies doubled on the center, slowly and silently creeping past my left flank toward the left flank of McCook's corps. I repeatedly sent him information of the approach of that heavy column of the enemy, but he testily declared that there was no truth in it, and refused to send a skirmish line of his own, that he might easily have done, and found out for himself. When Longstreet's corps sprang with a yell upon the left flank of McCook's corps, the line in my front advanced, and I retired to join Wilder as ordered. McCook's corps was wiped off the field without any attempt at real resistance, and floated off from the battlefield like flecks of foam upon a river. His artillerymen cut the traces, and leaving the guns, rode away toward Chattanooga. The rout of McCook's corps was complete. "

According to Aiken, the useless battle had been fought. 

Walker County was created in 1833 from Murray County. It appears that most of the first estates and will records here lost or burned. Some early settlers were G. W. Cook, H. S. Allgood, Thomas Abercrombie, A. M. Agnew, L. W. Bowles, James Bond, William B. Bird and Enoch Boss, Benjamin Hunt, Jack Puryear, Jeff Ponder, Dr. Adam Clements, Newton White, James Keown, Newton Keown, John Tate, William Hammontree, Jesse Griffin, Riley Stansell, Adam Davis, John Cavender, A. C. Word, W. M. Underwood, Needham Cannimore, Cornelius Kinsey, Roland Kinsey, John Oxford, Jacob Goodson, Matthew Keith, Andrew Womack, Joe Dodson, Constantine Wood, Hugh McClure, James Coulter, William Ramsey, Hezekiah Ellenburg, Davis Jackson, James Ransom, Reuben Haney, Johnny Crow, Andrew Cooper, Edom Moon, Jacob Arnold, Joel Cooper, Hiram Shaw, Mark Thornton, Martin Camp, Sam Burton, Henry Mitchell, John Caldwell, Spencer Marsh, Norman Pogue, William Shaw, Stephen Phillips, S. D. Dyer, Jeptha Hunter, Sam Hall, John Lumpkin, Joshua McConnell, John McWhorter, Thomas Sharpe, General Newman, Sanders McFarland, Andy Hicks, Milton Lawrence, Jason Conley, BOlden Whitlow, Isaac Garrett, Toliver Butler and others. 

Walker County Wills and Estate Records Available to Members of Georgia Pioneers Indexes to Probate Records

  • Index to Walker County Wills, Vol. I, 1883-1917.
  • Index to Walker County Inventories and Appraisements, Book A (1883-1895)
  • Index to Walker County Inventories and Appraisements, Book A (1883-1895)
  • Index to Walker County Annual Returns and Vouchers, Book A (1883-1888)
  • Index to Walker County Annual Returns and Vouchers, Book B (1888-1892)
Marriages
  • Walker County Marriages from Newspapers 1885-1886.
Church Records
  • Shiloh Baptist Church (Minutes).
Births
  • Walker County Births (1916-1921).
Maps
  • Walker County Map.
Digital Images of Walker County Wills (1866-1887)
Testators: James Agnew, William Arnold, Joshua Baker, Hartwell Bell, Thomas Blackwell, Catherine Branham, Thomas Bryan, James Campbell, William Caruthers, H. L. Center, John Chapman, Jacob Cleckler, Hugh Conley, M. M. Cook, Lemuel Corker, Alexander Coulter, John Duncan, Joshua Duncan, Asel Gilbreath, James Hall, Hamilton Hunt, Dudley Jones, Nancy Lawrence, William Little, John Long, Spencer Marsh, Thomas McIntire, George McWilliams, H. Mills, Thomas Patton, John Phillips, Thomas Phipps, John Pike, Patience Smith, W. Wall, George White, Henry Williams, Willie Woods.


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Sunday, May 22, 2016

First Female College in Georgia - Bibb Co. Wills, Estates, Marriages - #genealogy - #georgiapioneers


The First Female College in Georgia
By Jeannette Holland Austin

Wesleyan Female CollegeIn 1836, the citizens of Georgia began its campaign to educate their young women. The newspapers carried articles of protest that women remained ignorant for a want of an education. So it was, that after much to do about the education of young women, on 23 December 1836, the Georgia Female College was chartered. It opened its doors on 7 January 1839, with 90 young women enrolled. The course of study was liberal arts and sciences, including philosophy, astronomy, botany, chemistry, physiology, geology, history and ancient modern languages. The first class was graduated in 1840, its first graduate being Miss Catherine Elizabeth Brewer. When the Georgia Conference of the Methodist Church assumed responsibility in 1843, it was renamed as Wesleyan Female College. In 1917 the word "female" was eliminated from its title. Wesleyan was the birthplace of the first two Greek societies for the Adelphean Society in 1851 (now Alpha Delta Pi) and the Philomathean Society in 1852 (now Phi Mu).
Lizzie Smith Clements
Lizzie Smith Clements attended during 1870s. Among the first to study music at Wesleyan was a daughter of Colonel Davis Smith and Elizabeth of Monroe County - Jane Smith. Although names of all of the graduating classes did not survive or are not offered to the public, it is family tradition that Jane Smith was a graduate during the early part of 1850s. Later, Jane sent her daughter, Lizzie Smith Clements to Wesleyan who then passed the tradition down to her daughter, Mary Brent Chambliss. The search for names of Wesleyan graduates in the Georgia Graduates Database and the 1850 graduating class is available to member of GA Graduates and may be helpful in learning more about the times.

Bibb CountyBibb County

Bibb County Court House

Recommended Reading

Georgia Bible Records by Jeannette Holland Austin
The Georgia Frontier, 3 volumes, by Jeannette Holland Austin
Georgia Intestate Records by Jeannette Holland Austin
The Georgians by Jeannette Holland Austin
Index to Georgia Wills by Jeannette Holland Austin
30,638 Burials in Georgia by Jeannette Holland Austin
Georgia Obituaries
Discover when and where your relatives graduated from Georgia Schools. See GA Graduates and Photos

Georgia Senator Lost at Sea
By Jeannette Holland Austin
Jeannette Holland Austin
Oliver Hillhouse Prince was born in Montville, Connecticut and removed to Georgia during 1796 where he was elected Senator of Bibb Co. 1824 to 1825 and 1828 to 1829. He was the Commander of Bibb Academy in 1821 and commander to layout Maconin during 1824. Apparent he and his wife went on an ocean voyage because they were both lost at sea. Ref: Ga. State Archives Card Catalog.

Map of Bibb County, Georgia

Macon Factors







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Bibb County Probate Records and Genealogy


Macon, Georgia
Bibb County was created on Dec. 9, 1822 from portions of Jones, Monroe, Twiggs and Houston Counties. It was named for Dr. William Bibb, who was the first elected governor of Alabama. Dr. Bibb lived in Elbert County, and served in the U.S. House of Representatives in the U.S. Senate. He was appointed governor of the Territory of Alabama in 1816 and became the first elected governor of that state. In 1823 Macon was incorporated; named after Senator Nathaniel Macon of North Carolina. Researchers in Bibb County should also research the Jones County Records.

Bibb County Genealogy and Probate Records available to members ofGeorgia Pioneers

Abstracts of Wills
  • Wills 1823-1855
  • Wills 1851-1864
Digital Images of Wills 1823 to 1840
Testators: Asbury, Jonathan; Beall, Robert Augustus; Burnett, John; Burton, Robert ;Chambless, Henry; Church, Redman; Crockett, David ;Cutland, Redden; Daniel, William; Darragh, Archibald; Dixon, Thomas ;Fluker, Baldwin; Fort, Robert; Godfrey, Francis; Harrell, Hardy ;Howard, John; Huff, Edward; Jemison, Henry ;Jeter, Andrew; Johnston, William; King, John; Lamar, Benjamin; Lanier, John; Napier, Thomas; Nixon, William; Owens, Benjamin; Rogers, William ;Sapp, Henry; Scott, John ;Sigueux, Peter ;Smith, Henry ;Smith, James ;Summerlin, Sarah ;Tharp, John; Victory, Thomas ;Weed, Joseph ;Wells, Nicholas ;Williams, John; Williams, John D.

Digital Images of Bibb County Wills 1851 to 1865
Testators: Alexander, Elam;Allen, David;Bailey, James;Bailey, John;Ballard, C. M.;Blackshear, Albert;Blake, Eleanor;Bond, Joel;Bond, Joseph; Bonds, Penelope;Brewer, Edward Ebenezer;Brown, Turner;Busbee, W. R.;Boren, Alfred;Bowman, John;Brown, Eliza;Campbell, Watson; Carey, Martha Ann;Castlen, John;Champion, Elizabeth;Colbert, Frederick;Coleman, Robert;Collins, Charles;Collins, Robert; Collins, William; Cray, Mary; Damour, James;Daniel, Clarissa; Dean, William;Dempsey, Dermot;Dillard, Colin;Dillard, Olive; Eaves, John;Ernest, Asa;Evans, Rufus;Farrell, John;Feagin, Robert;Franklin, Marcus;Freerman, Robert;Gamble, William;Gilbert, Edward;Gorman, Thomas;Grierson, George;Griffin, James W.;Griffin, Larkin; Graybill, Midas;Groce, Margaret; Hazlehurst, Robert;Hughes, Frances;Huguenin, Edward, Colonel; Huguenin, Edward;Huguenin, Julia;Hunter, George R.;Irwin, John; Johns, Isaac;Johnson, Henry;Johnson, William J.;Jordan, Absalom; Kearney, Arthur;Kelly, Francis;Kelly, Julia;Kenedy, Nancy; Kilpatrick, William;Kunz, John Michael;Lamar, John;Lamar, John B.;Leslie, Ann;Lunsford, Priscilla;Malden, Caleb;Malone, Cherry; Massey, William;Mathews, Martha;May, Benjamin;McCall, Eleazer; McEver, Robert;McGuire, Martha;McMichael, John;Mitchell, Alexander;Munroe, Nathan;Newsom, Henry;Newsom, Henry (2);Norman, Sarah;Parker, Burwell;Peterson, John;Powers, Abner Parrott; Powers, Julia;Pye, Andrew;Raines, Cadwell;Ramsey, Mary;Rea, James;Reynolds, S. O.;Roach, Patrick;Ross, William A.;Shad, Elias;Simmons, Mary;Sims, Susan;Smith, James;Stevens, Elijah; Stevens, Simon;Stotesbury, Louisa;Stotesbury, Robert;Stubbs. James;Stubbs, Peter;Sullivan, John;Summerlin, Elison;Tharp, Elizabeth;Thomas, Merrel;Thomas, Micajah;Thomas, S. L.;Thomas, William;Thompson, Charles;Towns, George W.;Usher, Sarah;Wakeman, James;Ward, E. B.;Watts, Adelaide;Weed, Henry;White, Joseph; Wiley, Ann;Wiley, John B.;Wood, Lewis;Woolfolk, Thomas;Yearty, Thomas

Indexes to Probate Records
  • Wills and Estates (1823-1855)
  • Wills and Estates (1851-1871)
  • Wills and Estates (1870, 1891, 1914)
  • Wills and Estates (1891-1907)
  • Annual Returns (1823-1844)
  • Annual Returns (1843-1851)
  • Annual Returns (1851-1854)
Marriages
  • Marriage Book A 1831-1839
  • Marriages from newspapers 1885-1886
Maps
  • 1846 county map
  • 1855 county map
  • 1864 county map
  • Map of Macon, founded 1823. Bibb County.
  • Map of Macon, South from the Public Reserve. Bibb County
Miscellaneous Will Images
  • Calhoun, Elbert Estate
  • Chambliss, Christopher Estate
  • Chambliss, Henry Estate
  • Edmonds Estate
  • Gilbert, Edmund, LWT (1858)
  • Jemison, Robert W., minor
  • Johns, C. P. H. Estate
  • Lamar, Mrs. Mary Louisa Lamar, admx for estate of John Lamar, deceased
  • Lamar, John Estate
  • McLeod, Roderick Estate
  • Moore, J. G. Estate
  • Odum Orphans
Books
  • Bibb Notes by Jeannette Holland Austin
  • Memoirs of Georgia

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    NY, TN, TX)
Bundle and Save BUNDLE RATE for 8. Access to all eight websites plus additional data in other States: Bibles, genealogies, civil war records, colonial records, marriages, wills, estates, special collections, books written by renowned Georgia genealogist Jeannette Holland Austin.

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Saturday, May 21, 2016

Jenny Lind Inspired Music in Monroe Co. GA - Monroe Co. Wills, Estates, Marriages - #genealogy


Georgia Pioneers


Jenny Lind
Swedish Soprano Inspires Voice and Piano Lessons to Smith Family of Monroe County
By Jeannette Holland Austin

When the Swedish opera singer, Jenny Lind was brought to America by P. T. Barnum in 1850, she presented 93 large-scale concerts on tour, earning more than $350,000, most of which was donated to charities. She was affectionately known as the "Swedish Nightingale," Lind became famous after her performance in Der Freischutz in Sweden in 1838. However, thereafter suffered vocal damage, but the singing teacher Manuel Garcia saved her voice. She was in great demand in opera roles throughout Sweden and northern Europe during the 1840s, and was closely associated with Felix Mendelssohn. Lind was in Charleston, South Carolina when Colonel Davis Smith of Monroe County took his wife, Elizabeth, to hear the soprano. Colonel Smith came to Monroe County from Laurens County and built his plantation in Brent, Georgia in 1824. Elizabeth was a talented pianist, and during the couple's visit to Charleston, purchased a piano and brought it back to Brent. For the longest while, this instrument was known as the first piano in Monroe County! Elizabeth's daughter, Jennie Smith, was sent to study music at Wesleyan Female College in Macon, the first college of its sort in Georgia for women. More information on Wesleyan Female College

Smith Plantation
Davis Smith Plantation, built ca 1824 in Brent, Georgia. Seated in middle is Jennie Smith Clements Brent (named by her mother after "Jennie" Linn).

Smith Plantation of Brent, Georgia
Smith Plantation of Brent, Georgia


Forsyth, Georgia
Monroe County Landscape

Monroe County Map
 
Jeannette Holland AustinDid your Ancestors Fight with the Patriots?
By Jeannette Holland Austin

If you think that your family members did not associate with famous historical figures of their time, you are wrong. Isaac Smith of Monroe County enlisted from New Kent County, Virginia in the Virginia State Troops during the latter part of 1775. He must have been a true patriot to enlist so early in the Revolutionary War, for he went to Williamsburg where he served under Captain Robert Ballard for one year before going to Norfolk on a small scouting party where he was wounded by "a ball in the forehead." At the time he was in a regiment commanded by the famous Patrick Henry! During August of 1779, he was with General Washington in the battles of White Plains the taking of the Hessions at Trenton, Princeton, Brandywine, Germantown and Monmouth. But that was not enough, because after he was discharged in 1779 by General Muhlenberg, he joined the Militia of Kent County and was with that Militia at the siege of York and surrender of Lord Cornwallis. In other words, Isaac Smith stood side-by-side with the "bravest of the bravest" and most valiant heroes of the American Revolution. He was a person who believed in freedom and the American way; he never gave up the cause and fought until the very end of the war. If you wish to learn more about the good character of your progenitors, the names of their friends and neighbors and how they helped to build America, read the Revolutionary War pensions. The details of the battles and names of their officers were essential elements of their lives. And, perhaps tell a little bit about you?

Patrick Henry
Patrick Henry (1733-1799). How well did Isaac Smith know Patrick Henry and his friends? Dig a little deeper into the life of Henry and you might find out!


Map of Monroe County, Georgia


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Monroe County Wills, Estates, Maps, Marriages

Monroe County Court House

The first court house was built 1825 in Forsyth and served the community until 1895 or 1896 when a two-story brick edifice was erected. Monroe County was created on May 15, 1821 by an Act of the General Assembly after Creek Indians ceded lands between the Ocmulgee and Flint rivers on Jan. 8, 1821 in the first Treaty of Indian Springs. The land was istributed by the 1821 land lottery and named for James Monroe, President of the US. Later, portions of Monroe County were used to create the following counties: Bibb and Pike in 1822; Butts in 1825 and Lamar in 1920. Many families who lived in Bibb County also resided in Monroe.

Monroe County Records Available to Members of Georgia Pioneers

Digital Images of Monroe County Wills 1824-1847
Testators: Adams, Benjamin; Allison, David; Allright, David; Alston, Charity; Barron, Willis; Beall, James ;Beckham, Thomas; Bird, Clarissa ;Bird, James ;Bivins, Samuel ;Black, William ;Brantley, Benjamin; Brantley, Jeptha; Brantley, Nancy; Brewer, Henry; Cabaniss, Eldridge; Chancely, William; Chapman, Isaiah; Chappell, John ;Clower, Jesse; Clower, John ;Cochran, John ;Cohron, Elizabeth ;Colbert, James ;Colbert, John ;Colbert, William ;Coleman, David; Coleman, Robert ;Collier, Cuthbert ;Congleton, Allen; Cook, Nathaniel ;Cowles, Judith; Crowder, Frederick; Culloden, William ;Curry, Elijah ;Darden, Jethro; Darden, Stephen; Darden, William; Davis, Thomas ;Dillard, Arthur; Douglas, Miller; Dunn, Jone ;Dunn, Obedience; Durham, Matthew; Durham, Singleton; Durham, Thomas ;Durkee, Lewis; Dyess, Thomas; Edge, Obadiah; Edwards, John; Elder, Catharine ;Evans, John ;Fambrough, William ;Finch, Robert ;Fleming, James; Freeman, Edward; Freeman, Mathew; Freeman, Polly ;Gibson, Churchill; Gibson, John; Goggins, Abraham; Greer, John ;Hagood, Benjamin ;Hagood, Benjamin; Hamlin, Richard; Hamlin, Richard (2) ;Hanson, William; Harman, Zachariah; ;Harman, Zachariah (2)Harris, John ;Heath, Benjamin ;Hickman, John ;Hill, Henry ;Hogan, James; Hogan, William; Horn, John; Hudgens, Josiah ;Hunt, Turner Sr. ;Hunter, David; Jenkins, Francis; Johnson, Angus ;Johnson, Gideon ;Johnson, Larkin; Johnston, Archer ;Jones, Zedock; Jordan, Theophilus ;Keadle, Jeremiah ;Kelsey, Noah ;Lockett, Anna; Lockett, Cullen; Low, James; Malone, William; Mann, John Sr. ;McCary, Elizabeth; McGinty, Robert; McMullen, Fielder; Middlebrooks, Robert ;Middleton, John ;Milner, Peter; Mitchell, Margaret; Monk, John ;Moore, Joseph ;Morgan, James B. ;Moody, Jabez; Nelson, William S.; Nun, William; Owen, John; Partridge, William; Penn, Edmund; Phillips, Obadiah; Phillips, William ;Pinckard, James ;Pittman, John ;Ponder, John; Ponder, Margaret ;Pool, William; Pope, Jesse ;Pope, Wiley; Pratt, John (deed) ;Pye, Ann; Roberson, Mary; Rogers, John; Rogers, John (2) ;Rogers, Wiley ;Rutland, Riddick; Slack, John ;Smith, Augustus G. ;Smith, John D.; Smith, Seaton ;Stallings, John; Stallings, Sarah; Standard, John ;Stubblefield, Catharine; Switzer, Bird ;Tatum, Milly ;Taylor, Eden; Turner, Abednego; Turner, Ezekiah; Vandiver, Marcus; Walker, Sylvanus; Wallace, Mary; Wallis, Richard ;Watson, Benjamin; Watson, John Sr. ;Wilder, William ;Williams, William; Wilson, John; Wilson, Larkin ;Womack, Abraham; Wood, Henry ;Woodard, Orren ;Woodward, Keziah
Monroe County Wills (abstracts)
  • Monroe County Wills 1824-1847 (abstracts).
  • Monroe County Wills 1848-1875 (abstracts).
  • Monroe County Wills 1868-1878 (abstracts).
  • Monroe County Wills 1876-1927 (abstracts).
Indexes to Monroe County Probate Records
  • Index to Monroe County Wills 1824-1847
  • Index to Monroe County Wills 1866-1876
  • Index to Monroe County Miscellaneous Estates 1861-1869.
  • Index to Monroe County Annual Returns, 1823-1858.
Miscellaneous Records
  • Bass, Joshua (estate)
  • Browning, Elizabeth deed to Marcus Culpepper (Digital Image).
  • Chambliss, John, LWT (1879) (Digital Image).
  • Chambless, Thomas, Guardian of Charles J. Chambless (Digital Image).
  • Chambliss, Zachariah, LWT (1874) (Digital Image).
  • Ethridge, E. N., Estate, Z. H. Chambless, executor (Digital Image).
  • Evans, Elizabeth, estate (Digital Image).
  • Evans, Thomas, estate (Digital Image).
  • Harman, Rebecha, LWT (1830), transcription.
  • Head, George W., LWT (1898) and (1956) (digitalImages0
  • Head, Peter estate)(digital image)
  • Head, W. H. (1887) digital images)
  • Joiner, Hiram P. Estate (Digital Image).
  • Job Taylor deed to Eli B. Browning (Digital Image).
Maps
  • 1821 Monroe County Boundary Map
  • 1822 Monroe County Map
  • 1865 Monroe County Map
  • 1915 Forsyth Map
Marriages
  • Monroe County Marriages 1824-1850 (transcription).
  • Monroe County Index to Marriages 1824-1845 (from county)
  • Monroe County Marriages from newspapers 1885-1886.

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County Records of 8 Genealogy Websites

Alabama
Georgia
Kentucky
North Carolina
Virginia
South Carolina
Tennessee


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  5. VirginiaPioneers.net
  6. Genealogy-Books.com
  7. GaGraduates.com (Graduates database from ca 1830 to 1925)
  8. SoutheasternGenealogy.com (Miscellaneous records in AL, LA, MD, PA, NJ
    NY, TN, TX)
Bundle and Save BUNDLE RATE for 8. Access to all eight websites plus additional data in other States: Bibles, genealogies, civil war records, colonial records, marriages, wills, estates, special collections, books written by renowned Georgia genealogist Jeannette Holland Austin.

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Friday, May 20, 2016

Pioneers and Peanuts - Irwin Co. GA Wills, Estates 1821-1864 - #genealogy - #georgiapioneers

Jeannette Holland AustinPioneers and Peanuts
By Jeannette Holland Austin

The risks of venturing across untamed territories could be daunting. Especially, if it was in South Georgia among the Creeks. The division of Irwin County was the result of Treaties made with local Indians, but before those lands were opened for settlement, white people were not welcome. Yet, there were trading posts around Augusta and middle Georgia near Fort Hawkins and the Indian Agency. The territories of Appling, Irwin, and Early counties were ceded in 1814 and 1818. Irwin was created by an Act of the Legislature in 1818 and later on the five adjacent counties were taken from Irwin. It was offered in the land lottery in units of 490 acres. During 1820 each lot was priced at $18, but by 1831 the price had been reduced to $5 per lot. Its sandy, loamy soil produces peanut crops for which it is known today. In other words, peanuts are no small item in Ocilla.

peanuts

Irwin County Wills, Estates, Marriages

Irwin County was on Dec. 15, 1818 from Creek lands acquired in 1814 by the Treaty of Fort Jackson. Therefore, genealogists should acquire a little history and determine the trail. Generally, the places to search are Irwin, Early and Appling. The 1821 Land Lottery attracted settlers to draw 490 acres.

Probate Records Available to Members of Georgia Pioneers

Indexes
  • Will Book No. 1, 1821-1864
  • Annual Returns, Appraisements, Sales, Minutes, 1822-1855
  • Annual Returns, Appraisements, Sales, Minutes, 1863-1875
Marriages
  • Marriages 1827 to 1872
  • Irwin County Marriages from newspapers 1885-1886.
Images of Wills Book 1, 1821-1864
Testators: Branch, David;Brown, Phillip;Dormany, John; Gideon, Katherine;James, Charles;Marsh, Reibin;Millen, George; Ross, William D;Tomberlin, John;Willcox, George;Young, Isaac M.

See how Easy it is to Read old Wills and Estates on Georgia Pioneers
William Hall


Learn if your ancestors left a will or estate record?  An easy, quick (and free) way to find out is to click on the links below.
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County Records of 8 Genealogy Websites

Alabama
Georgia
Kentucky
North Carolina
Virginia
South Carolina
Tennessee


Become a Member
  1. GeorgiaPioneers.com
  2. KentuckyPioneers.com
  3. NorthCarolinaPioneers.com
  4. SouthCarolinaPioneers.net
  5. VirginiaPioneers.net
  6. Genealogy-Books.com
  7. GaGraduates.com (Graduates database from ca 1830 to 1925)
  8. SoutheasternGenealogy.com (Miscellaneous records in AL, LA, MD, PA, NJ
    NY, TN, TX)
Bundle and Save BUNDLE RATE for 8. Access to all eight websites plus additional data in other States: Bibles, genealogies, civil war records, colonial records, marriages, wills, estates, special collections, books written by renowned Georgia genealogist Jeannette Holland Austin.

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REOCCURRING SUBSCRIPTION WITH PAYPAL = $150 per year. Guaranteed low rate so long as your subscription continues to renew itself. You may unsubscribe at any time, however, to prevent the reoccurring charge, you must "cancel" before the renewal date. To do this, login to your PayPal account and select the cancel option.
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Thursday, May 19, 2016

Wealthiest Woman in the South Despised Plantation Life - Houston Co. GA Wills, Estates, Marriages

Jeannette Holland AustinWealthiest Woman in the South Despised Plantation Life
By Jeannette Holland Austin

At one time, cotton was "King" in Georgia. The crop is still grown today in South, Central and Southwest Georgia in counties such as Dooly, Colquitt, Mitchell, Worth, and Decatur. During the early days Georgia grew the lucrative cash crop of rice, however, before the American Revolution (1775 to 1783) cotton became another staple in the southern home. spinning wheel The Sea Island Cotton imported from the West Indies was grown along the coast because it produced a long, strong fiber easily separated from the seed. The invention of the cotton gin by Eli Whitley was a welcome relief to planting and weaving. Southerners wove their own cloth from raw cotton, hemp and other crops. The plantation life from sun up to sun down was shared by all of the family members, including the lady of the house whose duty it was to teach slaves to sew and weave cloth as well as to harvest herbs and plants for medicines. It is laughable to read how the actress, Fanny Kemble, hated plantation life and wrote a stinging criticism and rebuke of it in her book Life on a Georgia Plantation. She was married to one of the richest men in America, Mease Butler, who owned thousands of acres in New England, the South Carolina and Georgia. No doubt, the actress lived a finer existence than the average planter.

Houston County Wills, Estates and Marriages

Houston County Houston, Peach and Bibb County records should be simultaneously researched by the genealogists to locate threads of family information. Houston County, Georgia was established in 1821 from Indian lands, and was named after Governor James Houstoun. Families came to Houston County from Virginia, North Carolina, and South Carolina and from Houston County migrated after the Civil War into Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, and especially Texas. Early Settlers: William Amos, Daniel Adams, Simon Barden, James Burnsides, David Clark, Curtis Daniel, Jeremiah Dupree, Thomas Doles, James Everett, James Grace, Michael Howard, James Killen, John Lafoy, Joshua Mercer, Jesse Pollock, and James Vinson.

Houston County Probate Records Available to Members of Georgia Pioneers

Marriages
  • 1820 to 1850
  • Marriage Book B, 1852-64 (index of brides and grooms)
  • Houston County Marriage Book C, 1875-1898 (index of brides and grooms)
Houston County Wills 1827 to 1855

Indexes to Houston County Probate Records
  • Will Book A, 1827 to 1855.
  • Will Book B, 1855-1896.
  • Annual Returns and Vouchers, Book A, 1824-1833
  • Annual Returns and Vouchers, Book B, 1833-1848
  • Annual Returns and Vouchers, Book C, 1847-1851
  • Annual Returns and Vouchers, Book D, 1852-1853
  • Annual Returns and Vouchers, Book E, 1853-1854
  • Annual Returns and Vouchers, Book F, 1854-1855
Miscellaneous Records
  • Clark, Dempsey, LWT
  • Strong, Christopher (will)
  • Vinson, James (will)


See how Easy it is to Read old Wills and Estates on Georgia Pioneers
William Hall


Learn if your ancestors left a will or estate record?  An easy, quick (and free) way to find out is to click on the links below.
arrow

County Records of 8 Genealogy Websites

Alabama
Georgia
Kentucky
North Carolina
Virginia
South Carolina
Tennessee


Become a Member
  1. GeorgiaPioneers.com
  2. KentuckyPioneers.com
  3. NorthCarolinaPioneers.com
  4. SouthCarolinaPioneers.net
  5. VirginiaPioneers.net
  6. Genealogy-Books.com
  7. GaGraduates.com (Graduates database from ca 1830 to 1925)
  8. SoutheasternGenealogy.com (Miscellaneous records in AL, LA, MD, PA, NJ
    NY, TN, TX)
Bundle and Save BUNDLE RATE for 8. Access to all eight websites plus additional data in other States: Bibles, genealogies, civil war records, colonial records, marriages, wills, estates, special collections, books written by renowned Georgia genealogist Jeannette Holland Austin.

Membership to 8 Genealogy Websites - Reoccurring subscription with guaranteed low rate

REOCCURRING SUBSCRIPTION WITH PAYPAL = $150 per year. Guaranteed low rate so long as your subscription continues to renew itself. You may unsubscribe at any time, however, to prevent the reoccurring charge, you must "cancel" before the renewal date. To do this, login to your PayPal account and select the cancel option.
About your password. Please allow up to 2 hours for your password. If not received in a timely manner, CLICK to send reminder
bee NEWEST ADDITIONS TO 8 GENEALOGY WEBSITES !



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